Q: I know I'm ignorant, but can you please tell me what is the real and the causes of the gaza conflict?

fotojournalismus:

This is a great piece from New Yorker written by Rashid Khalidi, which I think is worth reading, and take it as an answer to your question please. 

"When you imprison 1.8 million people in a hundred and forty square miles, about a third of the area of New York City, with no control of borders, almost no access to the sea for fishermen, no real way in or out, and with drones buzzing overhead night and day… eventually, the ghetto will fight back. It was true in Soweto and Belfast, and it is true in Gaza. We might not like Hamas or some of its methods, but that is not the same as accepting the proposition that Palestinians should supinely accept the denial of their right to exist as a free people in their ancestral homeland."

Read the rest here: “Collective Punishment in Gaza


asked by Anonymous
491 notes
asapscience:

“A large school of mobula rays fades into the waters of Baja, Mexico. “The rays were moving quite fast and it was hard enough keeping up with them from the surface, let alone diving down to take a closer look,” writes photographer Eduardo Lopez Negrete. Mobula rays are often referred to as flying rays due to their fondness for breaching.” — the 2014 National Geographic Traveller Photo ContestLet’s also keep in mind that a mobula ray can reach 17 foot (5.2 meter) wingspan and weigh over a ton. Freaky or cool? 
via Sploid

nhude:

I wanna meet someone’s who’s going to be like ‘hey wake up I’m taking you on an adventure’

(via glennivere)

74,555 notes
victoriousvocabulary:

NEMORICOLOUS
[adjective]
living in forests or groves.
Etymology: from Latin nemori- (stem of nemus), “grove” + -colous, a combining form meaning “inhabiting”.
[Sylvain Sarrailh]
sherlockedfilmmaker:

fuckingconversations:

karenfelloutofbedagain:

theonewholovesbooks:

introverted-reader:

This is so beautiful :’)

Wow

I fucking love people who find street-side self-employment to do what they love. When I was in high school, there was a kid in my AP Bio class, really smart and intelligent and loved biology, but he was just so disillusioned with the academic situation in America that he didn’t even want to go to college. Our bio teacher asked him how he was going to find a career in biology without a degree, and he said he’d buy an electrophoresis kit and set it up in a city square and just let people watch the DNA fragments travel through the gel, and set out a hat or whatever to take donations. A biology street-performer. We all laughed, but last summer I was in Boulder, and there was this man on Pearl Street, along with the magicians and harpists and such, and he had a high-powered telescope. You could look through it and see the planets and stars in broad daylight, and he’d point them all out to you and give you a little lesson. He had a hat out and a cardboard sign asking for three dollars to look through the telescope, and he had a line of people. There’s something incredibly inspiring to me about the people who want to do something so badly that they’ll do it on the street if they have to. 

I saw a guy giving free compliments, and taking donations on the street. He would wax poetic about the beauty of the people walking by - their hair, their clothing, “the light shines off the blue of your eyes, while the skies of venice weep in shame, to wish they could match a shade so clear and bright.” Dude had class.
No matter what gender or age passed by, he had something kind to say to them. 

Beautiful
Q: What is 50 shades of grey about? And what's so bad about it?

aconissa:

50 Shades of Grey was originally fanfiction based on the Twilight series, which was then published as a novel (along with 2 subsequent books). It sold over 100 million copies around the world and topped best-seller lists everywhere. It’s about to be adapted into a film, set to come out early next year.

It follows a college student named Ana Steele, who enters a relationship with a man named Christian Grey and is then introduced to a bastardised and abusive parody of BDSM culture.

While the book is paraded as erotica, the relationship between Ana and Christian is far from healthy. The core mantra of the BDSM community is “safe, sane and consensual”, and 50 Shades is anything but. None of the rules of BDSM practices (which are put in place to protect those involved) are actually upheld. Christian is controlling, manipulative, abusive, takes complete advantage of Ana, ignores safe-words, ignores consent, keeps her uneducated about the sexual practices they’re taking part in, and a multitude of other terrible things. Their relationship is completely sickening and unhealthy.

Basically, “the book is a glaring glamorisation of violence against women,” as Amy Bonomi so perfectly put it. 

It’s terrible enough that a book like this has been absorbed by people worldwide. Now, we have a film that is expected to be a huge box-office success, and will likely convince countless more young women that it’s okay not to have any autonomy in a relationship, that a man is allowed to control them entirely. It will also show many young men that women are theirs to play with and dominate, thus contributing to antiquated patriarchal values and rape culture.


asked by Anonymous
104,038 notes
Don’t walk behind me; I may not lead. Don’t walk in front of me; I may not follow. Just walk beside me and be my friend. Albert Camus (via placidthoughts)
5 notes
this correctly describes the relationship between me and my parents